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Netflix has broadened its offline streaming feature to Windows 10 via its Windows 10 PC app. So Netflix users will have another option whenever they are without Internet access.
Netflix added the feature in their most recent update to the Netflix app in Windows 10. Take note the Windows Store doesn’t show you what version of the Netflix app you’re using so just manually check for updates using the large blue button in the upper-right corner of the Windows Store app.

The Netflix app will show you a large popup type screen that shows the new “download and go” ability. The Find me something to download button doesn’t at this time display a list of downloadable titles so you will have to find them yourself.

The offline streaming option was only available for its mobile apps such as Android and iOS which was not without its fair share of flaws but was overall a welcome addition. The Netflix app is a Microsoft UWP app so I am guessing the offline streaming will pop up on Windows phones and on the Xbox.

So what is the big deal right? On a mobile device is cool but this opens up the feature to be used on larger screens which notebooks and desktop PCs have. So more time enjoying content instead of squinting at your mobile device to keep up. There are ways around it with options like screen mirroring to any available TV screen you have but from a PC doing this can be much easier without the occasional text or app notification disturbing your viewing of content.


You are on a project. Doesn’t matter what it is from typing a resume, typing your school report, writing your book, or  creating that life changing presentation. Windows 10 knows but really could care less. Windows 10 will take over, force updates down your throat, and reset on that a$%. Crazy thing though is that once the process has begun, there isn’t much you can do about it except wait. You may have to wait a good while too depending on the circumstances like the speed of your device and the size of the update.

So if you have not saved what you were doing you are pretty much:



It doesn’t look like Microsoft plans to fix this anytime soon and really quite frankly it isn’t really a bug or issue. It’s Windows Update probably making sure your computer is secure. The events that happen due to forced updating though are real unfortunate though. As for these events. Let’s take a look at them, shall we?

As you can see, this has become a real problem for people. But you can avoid this from happening to you. The last tweet may make you skeptical but unless you want this to happen to you maybe you should read on.

Take Control of Windows 10 Updates

To start off in order:

1. Click the Start Button
2. Then Click Settings
3. Click on Update & Security
4. Make sure to select Windows Update
Once selected you will see a window like this  ⇒
In the window, you will see the options related to Windows Update. You can do a manual update by clicking Check for updates. You can check your update history. You can also change when Windows will be allowed to perform updates. You do this by clicking Change active hours under the Update setting heading.

5. Once you click Change active hours you will see a pop-up of sorts with a description of the option. Basically you just tell Windows the hours you use your computer the most or when you do not want it to restart on you and perform updates. It looks like this  ⇒

Responses from Microsoft


I was curious if Microsoft ever responded to the myriad of complaints and found a a good number but most just seemed like programmed responses to me. So I will just show you one response that pretty much sums it all up.

Once a machine is upgraded to Windows 10, it will remain current through Windows Update for the supported lifetime of the device, with safety and security, productivity, and entertainment value over time. This is what we mean when we talk about delivering Windows as a service, and it is one of our core inspirations for Windows 10. We’ll keep listening to our customers, improving the experience month after month. Windows 10 is an operating system that will run on a range of devices — from Xbox to PCs, phones to tablets and tiny gadgets — all of which are connected and kept up-to-date by Windows Update. Both enterprises and consumers benefit. The optimum way to ensure our customers are running the best Windows is to get them the latest updates for Windows 10. Delivering Windows 10 as a service means we can offer ongoing security updates, new features and capabilities – we’d like to make sure people can get access to the latest Windows 10 updates as soon as they are available.

So like I mentioned earlier it is not a bug at all but just a feature I guess. Windows Update has always been around so it is just something everyone should be familiar with. The forced updating though is a bit more aggressive than it has been in the past. I have seen people consider switching to Mac over this but it really is a none issue. I am not trying to minimize the scenarios of people losing sensitive data over the updates. What I am saying is that once it happens you should then take action to avoid it from happening again. Google now a days is the tool to use when you have a question you need answers for. There are numerous rantings and complaints about this which get into taking people’s choice away and performing updates while people are asleep but truth is someone will always find an issue with it no matter what approach is taken. Do nothing and Windows is continually labeled as the less secure system giving Apple OS the praises. Now that Windows is moving into a more secure place now people want to complain.

The forced updating of Windows may have been a small miss step but a solution has been offered for  it. You just have to research, google it, Yahoo It, and Bing It. Or you can just visit Ninja’s site and ask…   😉



Bouncing around the web I ran into a reddit page from a user called “illCodeYouABrain” who while opening Firefox at times receives a message from Windows 10 (image shown link). I thought it was a little interesting but wanted to know for sure or rather what prompted Microsoft to create such a notification.

So apparently Microsoft has enabled a set of ‘Windows Tips’ that lets users who use Firefox and Chrome know that their Edge browser is safer. I do remember some news months ago about Windows 10 warning Chrome and Firefox users about battery drain related to those browsers and recommended using Edge instead.  This notification of course most likely applies to those that have portable Windows 10 devices like tablets and laptops. My first reaction to it was just a simple “okay”.  I can understand already how battery drain can be applied to Chrome and Firefox just from my own personal use of the browsers. Both have more features and having addons in any browser will equate to more battery use depending on the addons you like to use. Microsoft even supposedly performed an experiment to prove it. (video on left) I don’t know how trustworthy this would be and I have a lot of questions on the test itself but either way it would not surprise me for reasons I have mentioned latter.

The notification can at times popup when opening Firefox as well as Chrome; and, if anyone has seen this popup make a comment. Microsoft of course will only respond with rhetoric that coincides with the tone they use in the Windows 10 environment with words like “We want to provide easy information that can help our users enhance their Windows 10 experience.” I will add that you can change the settings for this feature if you open Settings => System => Notifications => Disable “Get tips, tricks and suggestions as you use Windows”

win10tipsdisable

So where does this tip find its merit? Well NSS Labs performed a comparison of the 3 major browsers. Now I know Microsoft in the past has asked them to do studies and Internet Explorer has come out on top but apparently this time Microsoft had not commissioned this study. I have the results and read through them and this is the scoop.

The NSS test results were obtained from live testing where all browsers were subjected to the same set of social malware. “This test comprised 220,918 test cases that included 5,224 unique suspicious samples. Ultimately, 304 samples met NSS validation criteria and were included as part of the test.”

The Edge browser blocked a great 99% of the socially engineered malware (SEM) that was thrown at it. Now this is due to SmartScreen URL Rep and App Rep which are reputation based defenses that protect you from malicious links and downloads. Chrome and Firefox use Google’s Safe Browsing service. Just check the image (right) to see how the the others compared in this test.

There were 2 tests and the next one was in phishing protection, namely the average phishing URL catch rate for browsers over a 12 day period where Edge hit 91.4% while Chrome and Firefox also following closely. (image on left)


Security is important in all browser and Microsoft has been on the ball as far as security in concerned. It seems Edge is pretty secure. Now will these result make you want to switch? Idk. Mozilla and Google have a good history of keeping their users safe. Now Edge is a Windows 10 only browser while Firefox and Chrome are available on PC, Mac, and Linux. Edge having less features and being less compatible being addon-less will of course make it more secure just on that point alone but I see changes little by little as Microsoft aspires to add more to the Edge browser. Overall??? Nothing beats user knowledge. The NSS report itself says this

“Users who are able to identify social engineering attacks rely less on technology for protection against such attacks. Technology will sometimes fail, but those users who can identify social engineering attacks will remain protected, regardless of the method used to attempt social engineering.”

which is something I always tell my own clients anyways.

If you wish to view some of the other data from the NSS report you can just continue reading. Whatever your browser of choice is just remember what was just said and know that YOU are the best protection against threats.


Other Tests Performed

There were other tests between the two categories of SEM and Phishing which I will show below.

SEM

Socially Engineered Malware



New threats are always an issue and will continue to be and so how fast your browser can respond to new threats is also important. This image shows how long it took for each browser to block a threat once it was introduced. The cumulative protection rates were calculated each day until the threats were blocked. “During the test, Microsoft Edge demonstrated a 98.7% zero-hour protection rate for malware. Microsoft Edge blocked 5.9% more malware than Google Chrome and 20.4% more malware than Mozilla Firefox. By the end of the seventh day of testing, Microsoft Edge was maintaining a 3.6% lead over Google Chrome and a 17.4% lead over Mozilla Firefox.”

fig2-zerohoursem



“Figure 3 depicts the average time to block SEM samples for each browser.”

fig3-avgtime2blocksem

“Microsoft Edge required an average of less than ten minutes to block new SEM. At more than two hours and 39 minutes, Google Chrome had the next best average time to block. Mozilla Firefox took longer than three hours and 45 minutes to block malware.”



“Figure 4 compares the use of Google Safe Browsing API vs Microsoft SmartScreen.”

“Microsoft has invested significantly in its SmartScreen technology, which has constantly provided superior
protection for its users over time. When Google Safe Browsing API was first rolled out, it only offered protection against drive-by downloads and phishing sites. In response to the increase in socially engineered malware, Google added protection against SEM, which improved its block rate over previous NSS browser tests.”



“Throughout the test, new URLs hosting SEM were added, and URLs that were either no longer reachable or no longer delivering SEM, were removed. Figure 5 shows the consistency of protection of the tested browsers throughout the testing period.”

“Microsoft Edge had an average block rate of 99.0%; with its lowest recorded at 98.0%. Google Chrome had an average block rate of 85.8%; its lowest recorded at 50.0%. Mozilla Firefox had an average block rate of 78.3%, which was noticeably different than the 38.9% block rate it demonstrated at the beginning of the test.”

Phishing Malware

Masquerading as a legit entity to obtain sensitive info.



Equivalent data when referencing phishing attacks…

“Figure 2 depicts how long it took the browsers to block a threat once it was introduced into the test cycle. Cumulative protection rates are listed at the time of introduction, i.e., the “zero hour,” through the end of the test. Final protection scores for the duration of the URL test are summarized under the “Total” column.

fig2-avgtimeblockphishing

“Initial protection from phishing sites ranged from 82.7% for Google Chrome to 92.1% for Microsoft Edge. Since both Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox rely on the Google Safe Browsing API, their protection is almost identical.”



“Figure 3 answers the question of how long a user must wait on average until a requested phishing URL is added to a block list. It shows the average time to block a phishing site once it was introduced into the test set, but only if it was blocked during the the test. Unblocked sites are not included,…”

“The average time to block a site (if it is blocked at all) is 56.4 minutes. Microsoft Edge was significantly faster at adding protection in the earliest hours of a phishing attack than any of the other browsers. Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox took more than one hour on average to block new phishing websites.”



Daily users visit a wide range of sites that change from time to time thus phishing links also evolve along with it and keeping the phishing links blocked is key. NSS tested some live hyperlinks every six hours. The percentages will be different from the link results because this test entails multiple tests of a link. So if a link is blocked early on this will  improve the score while links missed continually will lower the score.

“Figure 4 shows protection at each of the 44 incremental tests of over a period of 12 days, and each score represents protection at a given point in time.”

“Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox use the Google Safe Browsing API. The mean detection rates for these browsers is very close; however, Chrome lags behind Firefox in early protection.”

Products by Amazon



ads by Linksynergy
Microsoft

A little confused as to why but apparently Microsoft has purchased LinkedIn. In case you did not know LinkedIn is is a business and employment-oriented social networking service that operates via the web. So again I asked…..why?  Well I have been noticing Microsoft make moves toward being more social. Windows 10 Microsoft decided to be more like Apple and Google by offering syncing services as well as an app store to coincide with their Operating System.  I assume this is just another step in that direction but let us look at a little history for Microsoft here shall we?

In 2014, Microsoft bought Nokia for $6.1 billion which proved to be a failure and was written off a year later.

Microsoft offers to buy Facebook for $15 billion but was declined. Kind of reminds me of a image I saw:

microsoft


So in this  deal for LinkedIn, Microsoft paid $26.2 billion which breaks down into: $196/share and a 50% premium on the share price at announcement time.  Which is cool actually since LinkedIn is popular but it has not been as profitable as one might think. Last year LinkedIn reported a yearly loss of about $165 million. This leads me to think as to how LinkedIn makes any money at all and I find out that LinkedIn has a recruiting service for corporations looking to hire employees. I know LinkedIn has advertising too but that could have really amounted to much of their earnings. I am saying how many of us are are LinkedIn as often as we are on Facebook? So since this is the case how is Microsoft going to make any money in this deal? Readers…. Microsoft basically paid $60 for every LinkedIn user. Shoot I signed up for free so if Microsoft paid for my account where is my money at?

Now the industry is moving more into social networking, cloud, and mobile devices while the application and operating system business dies down which places Microsoft in a better place to service this need by purchasing LinkedIn. Either way LinkedIn just has not really come on top but Microsoft has money to waste I supposed. I hear Microsoft has roughly $91 billion to lose or win so they can afford it.  Seeing what Microsoft has done with Windows 10 I am thinking they will look to integrate LinkedIn with their current offerings. So all of us 433 million users who use LinkedIn are going to eventually see LinkedIn powered by Microsoft or perhaps just be pushed into using Microsoft service offerings.


Microsoft’s first major Windows 10 update debuted yesterday with some new features and changes. Most of the additions are obvious, but there are a few hidden away. Here are several Windows 10 features you might not have discovered yet.

Find my device

 

You’re probably used to using a find my device feature on your phone, but what happens if you lose your laptop? In most versions of Windows you’d have to settle for a third-party app to trust and track your laptop’s location, but Microsoft has decided to add this functionality straight into Windows 10. Just like the mobile equivalent, you can enable find my device and it will track the last known location of your laptop or PC.

It’s linked to your Microsoft Account so you can sign-in on the web from another device if you lose your laptop or it gets stolen. You can find the setting to enable it in settings > update & security > find my device.

Cortana will let you reply to texts and more

 

If you have a Windows Phone then Cortana gets a lot more useful with the latest Windows 10 update. A new option in Cortana’s settings section lets you enable missed call notifications. That’s useful if you simply miss a call, but it also lets you reply to calls with text messages. Cortana will use your phone and its number to send the text, and you can even say “text Joe Bloggs” to initiate a text message without having to miss a call.

Sadly this isn’t available yet in the new Messaging app, so you need to use Cortana at the moment to send text messages. If you have a device with a stylus then Cortana will also let you create reminders based on times, dates, and locations that you scribble into digital notes. If you’re an Uber user then you can even link your account so Cortana will offer driving directions for events alongside an option to request an Uber ride.

Screenshot__4_.0
Automatic time zones

 

Windows has had the ability to set automatic time for years, but if you travel to another country it never changed time zones automatically. That’s changing with the latest Windows 10 update. Hidden away in settings > time & language is a new “set time zone automatically” option. It’s enabled by default if you install the latest update, and it does exactly what it says. Now if you’re travelling for vacation or work, you won’t get to your destination and be puzzled by your old time zone. It will finally work just like your smartphone does.

Cast media to device

 

Microsoft already supports DLNA and Miracast streaming inside Windows 10, but the latest update makes it a lot more discoverable. If you’re using Microsoft Edge then there’s a new option to “cast media to device” and elsewhere there’s a little cast icon in apps like photos or videos. The cast media feature lets you send photos, video, and audio to compatible devices with no setup required. It’s a lot like Google’s Chromecast feature now.

Screenshot__5_.0
Microsoft Edge sync passwords and favorites

 

It’s surprising that password, favorites, and reading list sync wasn’t enabled for the Microsoft Edge browser in Windows 10, but that’s changing with the new update. If you use multiple Windows 10 devices then you can enable the sync option in Edge settings so the browser finally syncs passwords and favorites across all the laptops and PCs you use.

New Skype apps

 

Microsoft is including Skype integration with its latest Windows 10 update, but you might not even notice it at first. If you install the latest update then apps like Messaging, Phone, and Skype Video will also be installed. You can find them using Cortana or the app list, and they’re basic versions of Skype features. They’re useful if you want a lightweight messaging app to talk to Skype friends, but they still need some improvements.

Screenshot__22_.0

Better app snapping

 

Windows 8 introduced some useful “Metro” app snapping features, and now Windows 10 is extending them to all apps. When you place two desktop apps side-by-side, like File Explorer and Notepad, you can now resize them individually and the other window will adjust to fill the gap. It’s a lot more like how Metro-style apps worked in Windows 8, and it’s great if you want to have apps side-by-side but have one act like it’s a sidebar. Just hover your mouse in the middle of two snapped apps and you’ll see a new slider will appear to let you adjust accordingly.

Verge Video: Windows 10 review

Source: The best hidden features in Windows 10’s major update | The Verge

Windows 10 Inside Out
Written by the award-winning team that created the best-seller Windows 7 Inside Out, it digs deep to explain not just how new features work, but why they work that way. The authors are backed by world-class technical editors and inside sources at Microsoft to make sure their information is accurate and complete.

Windows 10 is better (in ways) yet all that white is just annoying. I find it a bit hard to find where to place the mouse so I can drag windows from screen to screen. (Yes I have 2 screens.) Well Windows 10 uses white title bars (That is what they are called.) by default.  This is a bit of  a change from Windows 8 which did let you choose any color you wanted. There is a way to get some color to your desktop title bars.  Okay this method only affect some apps, mainly the traditional apps but not the universal apps. The universal apps stick to the white but a color change for some apps can really make a different for some depending on what apps you use consecutively. The univeral apps though depend on the developer of the app to specify a color. You can make the universal apps use a dark (hidden) theme though. I will talk about that after.

Microsoft Store

Change Windows Theme Files

Since Microsoft chose to rather force the white title bars we have to make a few changes. See in the DWM.dll theme file, there is code  that compares the current theme file with the “aero.msstyles” file which is the default theme  file. If it matches windows ignores the color in the file and sets the color to white. A solution… Just change the default Windows theme file to not have the name “aero.msstyles”.

 

  1. Open File Explorer and navigate to C:\Windows\Resources\Themes. (The more windows changes the more it stays the same.)
  2. Select the “aero” folder and copy it  (CTRL+C to copy) then paste it (CTRL+V to paste) right after into the same folder so you end up with 2 folders called aero, the 2nd folder having “copy” in its name. During the process you will get a UAC prompt that you will click “Continue” for. After select “Do this for all current items” and click “skip” when you see the File Access Denied window.
  3. FolderDeny Once you do that you will have made a folder called “aero – copy”. Rename it to whatever you want, in this case I will say rename it to “mytheme”. Just make sure you remember what you named it because you will have use that name later.
  4. Go inside your new folder “mytheme” and you will see a file named “aero.msstyles”. Rename it to “mytheme.msstyles”. Oh and click Continue when you see the UAC prompt.
  5. MsStylesRename.jpgOpen the en-US folder and you will see a file called “aero.msstyles.mui”. You need to rename it to “mytheme.msstyles.mui”. Again when you see the UAC prompt just click Continue. (The en-US folder may have a different name if you are using a different language version of Windows so just use a little common sense and goto the the folder with your language name with its shortened 2-letters and a dash with country code. Which in this case is US. (en = English, US = United States)
  6. StyleMUIRename imageNow go back to the main Themes folder and there is a file named “aero.theme”. You will need to copy it to your desktop because Windows will fight you in altering this file so copy and paste it to your desktop. Once you have your copy of the file on your desktop just rename it to “mytheme.theme”.
  7. Right-click on the mytheme.theme file and select OPEN WITH, then select CHOOSE another app (click on MORE APPs) and open the file with Notepad. Scroll down in the file and locate the line under [VisualStyles]. It should be reading like this: Path=%ResourceDir%\Themes\Aero\aero.msstyles. Replace or change the Aero part to mytheme so it reads like this:
    Path=%ResourceDir%\Themes\Aero\mytheme.msstyles.
    Save the file and close notepad. It will basically look like this.[VisualStyles]
    Path=%ResourceDir%\Themes\Aero\Aero.msstyles
    ColorStyle=NormalColor
    Size=NormalSize
    AutoColorization=0
    ColorizationColor=0XC40078D7
  8. Now select the mytheme.theme file you edited on your desktop and cut (cut and paste) it by pressing CTRL+X then go back to the C:\Windows\Resources\Themes folder then paste it by pressing CTRL+V. Agree to the UAC prompt when you are done.  These steps have helped you create a theme that can use colored window title bars.
  9. Now you have to activate the theme and you can do that by just simply double-clicking on it. Your title bars once finish applying should be colored now.

Personalization.jpg
From the images I am sure you see I have already done this so you have your proof that it does work. Windows 8 had like a default that auto chose a color based on the colors in your curerently selected wallpaper.   You can pick colors too if you want.  You just have to right-click on the desktop and select Personalize (the long way is to open your Start Menu and select Settings and find Personalization from there.) Once you are there just select the Colors option/category and disable the “Automatically pick an accent color from my background” toggle and a list of colors will show up. (Notice this window is still white.)

Personalization2.jpg
The list is  limited but if you are not satisfied with the choices you can still access the old school control panel applet by first pressing Windows Key+R to open up the Run dialog box then copy-&-paste the following command line into the run box and run the command by clicking OK. There will be a Show or Hide color mixer toggle arrow and using that you can get any color your want. If you do not see it you may have windows set to choose colors based on the wallpaper but you will still see colors in this window so just choose a color and it should show up.

This trick was tested using the latest version of Windows 10 (not a test build) from the date of this article.  Given what I have been seeing I would not be surprised if Microsoft adds more theming options later on as they seem to be listening a bit more to their users.  Alot of us techy people have been testing out development versions even after windows 10’s release and they have an improved feedback tool to help you voice your issues.

Microsoft

 

 

 

A screenshot of the Windows 10 upgrade notification.

A screenshot of the Windows 10 upgrade notification.

 

The Windows 10 upgrade dialog box offer

The Windows 10 upgrade dialog box offer

Windows Logo

I’m moving along doing my techno geek thang and what do you know, I notice a little icon on the bottom of my screen. So Microsoft has announced that Windows 10 is coming on July 29th, and I don’t even need to get out of your chair to get a spot in the upgrade line. So everyone take a peek at your Notification Area in the Taskbar and you should find a Windows icon that, when clicked will open a new Windows 10 upgrade panel. As I mentioned before, users will have a year to climb onto the……………………FREE Windows 10 bandwagon, but once you do, you will get free security upgrades for the life of whatever you are installed it on. Be picky what you choose to install it on my fellows techs.

 

So on July 29th get some Windows 10 goodness and be relieved that your Start Menu is back……..

Microsoft has been busy lately making my last update referring to Windows 9 an old memory for the most part. You can read on it here. I say read it because a good portion of the information is valid actually you will be able to see a progression here going on with Microsofts next operating system which will now be Windows 10, totally skipping 9. Why would they skip 9 and go Windows 10? A question everyone is asking. Well let’s try and figure that out.

I do need to point out that between Windows 3 and Windows 7, versions of Windows were designated by a name rather than a number: 95, 98, NT, Me, 2000, Vista, and so on. When Microsoft announced Windows 7, there was also some disbelief and after a series of named versions of Windows it would be odd to jump back to numbers. The name of each Windows release doesn’t really match the real version number; for example, Windows 8.1 is actually version 6.3 of Windows. Windows 10 is version 6.4. The last time the release name actually matched the version number was Windows NT 4.0, which was released back in 1996. (Wow does anyone remember Windows NT? Makes me a bit nostalgic. I may just pop that disk in and install it somewhere just to get that urge out.) Windows 2000 (Called NT 5.0 during development) was actually version 5.0. Windows XP was version 5.1. Windows Vista was 6.0, Windows 7 was 6.1, Windows 8 was 6.2, and Windows 8.1 is version 6.3. WinRT, which powers Metro, is a new and separate beast, it is not a full Windows animal but it still sits on top of the core Windows kernel. Whatever right? You might as well just go with and iPad running iOS if WinRT is something you like. Modern versions of Windows are still based on the Vista (including Windows 10) which is actually Windows 6.4 and as times goes by there will most likely be more confusion.

I hear that the number 9 is considered unlucky in Japan. Microsoft having enough stigmas on its plate to get away from may have just simple skipped 9 to avoid any ill will. Funny thing is I remember an Antivirus software maker doing that (Trend Micro) and I always wondered why but never cared enough to really want to find out. Looking into it now I see Trend Micro is a Japanese company, go figure.

So again I ask the question and the response I find is from Tony Prophet (Microsoft corporate vice president, Windows Marketing) which is that “It came and it went.” I had to literally watch clips on youtube of the conference to even see it. Going through different clips I found his answer. I think he was quoting Satya Nadella (Microsoft CEO). The idea seems to be to distance Windows 10 from Windows 8 while Windows 10 not being some ,”incremental step from Windows 8.1.” Microsoft has had the the goal to make one thing for all devices and that goal continues further with Windows 10. Microsoft is handling things with Windows 10 different also. At this moment anyone can try out the Windows 10 Technical Preview which is updated pretty often. Windows 8 having a bad name Microsoft is definitely working for a change. I know Windows 8 sort of skip Enterprise customers and most if not all companies are just upgrading their PCs and running Windows 7. Prophet says Windows 10 will be different.

So what is new?…. Microsoft actually committed to a Summer 2015 date to release Windows 10. Microsoft is planning to launch Windows 10 in 190 countries and it will be available in 111 languages. Cool stuff that only gets better. Anyone tired of Window 7? or even XP? (Goodness no one should still have XP now.) Well Microsoft will be offering Windows 10 as a free upgrade for anyone running Windows 7 or Windows 8 which leaves out about 21% of all desktop users still using XP and/or Vista.

Microsoft is also partnering with different companies to help facilitate the upgrade to Windows 10 in China. In China pirating is big and it is said that about 75% of users in China are running some pirated version of Windows and Microsoft is giving Windows 10 away to anyone running pirated windows also. This will go on for 1 year. I microsoft will get a lot of coverage with this going on.

I thought about explaining Windows 10 and I will talk about a few things but I prefer to just show you. Here are some images of Windows 10.

I also have a video for you to give you a better idea of what Microsoft has so far.


Updates and Links:


Windows 10 will not support Media Center.


Checking out my twitter I see a tweet from old Gabe:

So those of you who decide to upgrade will lose Media Center functionality altogether. Gabriel Aul’s Twitter post will catch the attention of the die hard Media Center fans. He did mention,”If you have WMC now, we’ll have a DVD option for you in an update later this year,” which to most just means you will be able to play your DVD movies still but this does not say anything about those that use WMC to watch TV. What about the home theatre PCs that use the convenient funtionality of Windows Media Center?


Project Spartan Browser


Microsoft is working on a new browser for Windows 10. Looks like they are considering to get rid of Internet Explorer. I do believe Microsoft will keep Internet Explorer though for corporate use. Compatibility issues will arise and businesses are not keen up updating to the newest Microsoft anything as soon as it comes out.


Windows 10 Available on the Rasberry Pi 2 Micro Computer & the Intel Minnowboard Max



Project Spartan Browser now has a name……The Edge Browser


Again I say, farewell Internet Explorer and make way for Microsoft’s next browser, Edge. Edge will be the default browser for Windows 10 and will not run on older versions of Windows. (For now. I’m sure someone cool person will find a way around this. Although virtual windows could be an option.) The browser will be better though…..eventually. I can think of about 5 ways it will be better.

  1. Edge does have more optimized code base then IE. Microsoft stripped away all the code no longer needed to support backward compatibility and as a result is zippier. According to Microsft, the current build of Edge ran twice as fast as IE 11 in recent tests using the Google Canary benchmarking software. It also handily beat the latest beta 64-bit builds of the Chrome and Firefox browsers in this test supposedly. So far Edge has over 4,200 interoperability improvements over IE11. Built on Microsoft’s Universal Windows Platform, the browser renders pages more uniformly across different devices, and brings it more in line with other browsers in this respect. An improvement since IE on Windows Phone struggles to render pages properly.
  2. Edge will support JavaScript-based extensions, allowing third parties to customize views of Web pages and add new functionality. Edge extensions must be written using the Web languages of HTML and JavaScript. Extension support won’t come with the initial release of the Edge, but will be available by the end of the year.
  3. Since the beginning, IE carries a lot of baggage for backward compatibility. IE 11 comes with a variety of legacy modes, mostly to support enterprises who built internal applications around IE6 or some other older version. Microsoft needed to make a clean break, especially given how quickly Mozilla, Google and Apple were updating their own browsers. Hmmm, Edge will not support Microsoft’s ActiveX, Browsers Helper Objects (BHOS), VBScript and third-party toolbars built for IE11, all of which are a pain in the butt for a tech like me. Everyone is always installing toolbars like those by Mindspark. All of these things slow down performance and add security issues. Edge will support Adobe Flash and Personal Document Format (PDF) and for those people who still require IE, Microsoft will maintain the browser for at least as long as it supports Windows 10, providing security fixes but no longer actively developing the browser.
  4. Edge is connected into Microsoft’s Bing search service and with Cortana, the company’s virtual personal assistant service. When you opt into these services, they can keep track of your actions on the browser in order to gather more context that would, in theory, help you in your travels across the Web. As you type a question in the URL address bar, Edge starts generating possible answers. Typing in the “msft” stock ticker will instantly return the current stock market price and company information. If you visit a Web page for a restaurant, the browser prepares a summary of information that might be of interest, like hours, directions, and a link to the menu. Edge can return movie show times and flight arrival times. I noticed launching the browser will give you a new tab start page with links to your most visited sites, as well as links to news stories and content that I guess it thought I may find interesting. I think it was just and estimation base on my browsing habits.
  5. Edge improves the user’s reading experience. The browser frame is less decorated with distracting menu commands and widgets. It will offer a “reading view,” which strips away all the menus, ads and other distracting elements that run alongside the text. Through a button click, Edge will also offer the ability to annotate Web pages. (I show that in the video) A user can make notes directly on a website, which can then be recalled the next time the site is visited. The browser will store the notes on the user’s computer and those with touch devices can also draw on top of the site. Annotations can be shared with other Edge users.

Windows 10 Release Date


Expected launched date is in July 2015